• Columns 

    Artist August: Darwyn Cooke [Art Feature]

    By | August 27th, 2014
    Posted in Columns | 2 Comments

    Is there a word for a sense of nostalgia felt for a time period you have no real connection to and weren’t even born in, but it just does more for you than what today does? Because I have that with the Silver Age. Specifically the Silver Age of DC Comics just after Marvel had shown up on the scene forcing them to try and patchwork their characters together and just before “Crisis On Infinite Earths” would usher in the Bronze Age. And I think Darwyn Cooke has a lot to do with that. I first saw Darwyn Cooke’s art in the film adaptation of “DC: The New Frontier” which lead me to seek out the comic itself. Cooke took characters from the DC Universe and looked at their progression from the Gold and Silver Ages of comics and charted an origin of the Justice League and DC Comics as we know it in one cohesive story. It’s a story I hold dear to my heart as I look wistfully into the distance wondering just what happened to the innate sense of wonder and optimism held in those characters that is crystallised in the artwork of Darwyn Cooke.

    Not that I can put Cooke in a box with his retro styled artwork for DC and call it a day. No, Darwyn Cooke is a much more diverse artist for that. While work like “DC: The New Frontier” was about capturing the clean, almost art deco style of the Silver Age his work on adapting the novels of Richard Starking’s Parker has shown a much more noir-oriented side to Cooke’s art. This is also shown in his work for today’s “All-Star Western” #34 finale issue.

    Darwyn Cooke is an important artist for me as his work harkens back to a time I wish I could experience and through work like “DC: The New Frontier”, I can.

    DC’s Trinity

    JLA

    Cover to “The Spirit” #10

    Cover to “Batman Beyond” #1

    Jonah Hex

    The Rocketeer

    World’s Finest

    Wonder Woman

    Power Girl

    Cover to “Batwing” #24

    Cover to “Catwoman” #1

    Richard Stark’s Parker

    Cover to “Batman/The Spirit” #1

    Cover to “All-Star Western” #34

    Variant cover to “Justice League” #33

    Nick Fury

    Cover to “Spider-Man’s Tangled Web” #11


    //TAGS | Artist August

    Alice W. Castle

    Sworn to protect a world that hates and fears her, Alice W. Castle is a trans femme writing about comics. All things considered, it’s going surprisingly well. Ask her about the unproduced Superman films of 1990 - 2006. She can be found on various corners of the internet, but most frequently on Twitter: @alicewcastle

    EMAIL | ARTICLES


    • A god amongst artists. So good. One of the creators I buy anything from, and that’s not a big list.

    • Dave Tobin

      Love Cooke! I picked up his illustrated hardcover of the first Parker novel over the summer and it showed a very different side of his work. His run on The Spirit was in my mind better than Eisner’s, and the issues he did on the previous Jonah Hex series were always some of the best.

    Columns
    Artist August: Evan “Doc” Shaner [Art Feature]

    By | Aug 31, 2014 | Columns

    Today brings Artist August to a close, and what better way to do that than with “Flash Gordon” artist Evan “Doc” Shaner. Long someone that every artist has fawned over for his clean, powerful art with a pitch perfect ability for delivering a story, with his work on “Flash Gordon” we’ve found an artist find […]

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    Columns
    Artist August: Tom Scioli [Art Feature]

    By | Aug 30, 2014 | Columns

    Full disclosure: I had another artist slated for this spot up until quite recently. I went with a pick that I felt was an important artist in the history of comics, and was excited to spotlight their work. However, when I started collecting pieces, I felt nothing. The work, while incredible, didn’t resonate with me […]

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    Columns
    Artist August: Liz Prince [Art Feature]

    By | Aug 29, 2014 | Columns

    Liz Prince’s comics are exactly the type of comics I want to see more of in the world. Her work lies somewhere between the self-reflection of Jeffery Brown and the raucous energy of James Kochalka, examining herself and her surroundings through the lens of a humorist. Her comics are easily digestible while simultaneously impactful and thought provoking, […]

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